Micro-crystal Earrings by Carol Roullard

Artist Carol Roullard creates unique jewelry from photomicrographs of micro-crystals. There are 10 pairs of earrings available; see the product gallery at left and descriptions of each below.

Earring length is 1.125 in. Each earring circle pendant is covered with a glass cabochon.

Product photos may have been enlarged and/or enhanced.

The product number appears on each photo.

$30.00

Clear

CR103, “Blocks and Angles”

These earrings each contain a small unique lidocaine image of iridescent blue and green crystals from a large micrograph called “Blocks and Angles.” This artwork is covered with intense colors and linear structures several running in opposing directions running into each other to form, you got it, blocks and angles.

Image: Lidocaine crystals
Originating Artwork: Blocks and Angles
Metal: silver tone

CR104, “Plume”

These earrings each contain a small unique lidocaine image from a large micrograph called “Plume.” This artwork has lidocaine crystals running upward to form a central shaft and fanning out to form the vanes. Each earring’s image contains crystals forming the vane. Note: “Plume” graced the cover of Autumn 2018’s Primary Dental Journal.

Image: Lidocaine crystals
Originating Artwork: Plume
Metal: silver tone

CR105, “Blocks and Angles”

These earrings each contain a small unique lidocaine image of iridescent multi-colors crystals from a large micrograph called “Blocks and Angles.” This artwork is covered with intense colors and linear structures several running in opposing directions running into each other to form, you got it, blocks and angles.

Image: Lidocaine crystals
Originating Artwork: Blocks and Angles
Metal: rose gold tone

CR106, “Come Together”

These earrings each contain a small unique section from a large menthol crystal micrograph called “Come Together.” This menthol artwork has intense warm-colored feathery structures rising up to flow together at the center of the image. I selected a portion with striking rich burgundy lines to frame one’s face.

Image: Menthol crystals
Originating Artwork: Come Together
Metal: silver tone

CR107, “Ice Phoenix”

Both of these earrings contain a small unique portion of “Ice Phoenix,” a micrograph of urea crystals. The artwork got its name from Greek mythology where the phoenix dies in a burst of flames. Check out the original artwork and see if you agree. I selected a portion of the crystals that had both the phoenix’s ice and fire and put it in each of the earrings.

Image: Urea crystals
Originating Artwork: Ice Phoenix
Metal: silver tone

CR108, “Come Together”

Both of these earring circle pendants contain a small unique section from a large menthol crystal micrograph called “Come Together.” This menthol artwork has intense warm-colored feathery structures rising up to flow together at the center of the image. I selected a portion with a range of rich linear sienna-color crystals to frame one’s face.

Image: Menthol Crystals
Originating Artwork: Come Together
Metal: gold tone

CR109, Vanillin and Lidocaine

Both of these earring circle pendants contain a small unique portion from a large micrograph of crystals formed from melting vanillin and lidocaine together. The resulting crystals have similar needle-like structures much like Plume, but are shorter and acquired some of the flow that is often exhibited in vanillin.

Image: Vanillin & Lidocaine crystals
Originating Artwork: n/a
Metal: silver tone

CR110, “Ice Phoenix”

Both of these earrings contain a small unique portion of “Ice Phoenix,” a micrograph of urea crystals. The artwork got its name from Greek mythology where the phoenix dies in a burst of flames. Check out the original artwork and see if you agree. This pair of earrings have a small portion Ice Phoenix’s “fire” crystals.

Image: Urea crystals
Originating Artwork: Ice Phoenix
Metal: gold tone

CR111, Vanillin and Lidocaine

Both of these earring circle pendants contain a small unique portion from a large micrograph of crystals formed from melting vanillin and lidocaine together. The resulting crystals have similar needle-like structures much like Plume, but are shorter and acquired some of the flow that is often exhibited in vanillin.

Image: Vanillin & Lidocaine crystals
Originating Artwork: n/a
Metal: silver tone

CR112, “Come Together”

Both of these earring circle pendants contain a small unique section from a large menthol crystal micrograph called “Come Together”. This menthol artwork has intense warm-colored feathery structures rising up to flow together at the center of the image. I selected a small portion where the crystals came together to formed an abstract construct.

Image: Menthol
Originating Artwork: Come Together
Metal: silver tone

Carol Roullard

Carol Roullard Art • www.CarolRoullardArt.com

Artist Carol Roullard.
Artist Carol Roullard.

Originally from the San Francisco Bay Area, Southern California artist Carol Roullard has been an avid photographer since high school. Through the years, Carol has continued to hone her compositional skills, focusing mainly on nature, looking forward to the day when she could merge her creative skills with her passion for art and science.

Since retiring in 2010, Carol has devoted more time to capturing artistic images. She expanded her nature photography to include the microcosmos. Using a high-powered microscope, Carol captures an extraordinary, intricate world—a world of dazzling tiny crystals. She searches for unique, complex crystalline scenes that will intrigue and inspire the viewer. Many of the captured images mimic land and seascapes; all will stimulate the viewer’s imagination to conceptualize how the micro-world relates to the macro-world.

Carol has exhibited and sold her unique art locally, nationally and internationally on multiple mediums. Her art has received numerous awards and has been featured in video, print and online publications.

Along with printing her art on paper, metal and canvas to be hung on walls, Carol’s micro-crystal art is currently printed on multiple products, including cell phone cases, tote bags, plates, coasters, and note cards.

Carol has expanded her creativity to include mixed media, painting and fluid acrylics. Another passion is writing; Carol has coauthored with her husband, Brian Matsumoto, nine camera-related books.

Click on each image to enlarge.

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